Events

Amida Care Community Figures 2

USCA Takeaways: Provocative Conversation on PrEPing for Sex

Were you unable to make it to the United States Conference on AIDS (USCA) in DC this year? Check out our takeaways from this 2017 USCA session, entitled “PrEPing For Sex: An Intimate Conversation about the Implications of Sex Positivity.” The diverse conversation around sex and pleasure, spirituality and religion, and gender and sexuality included HIV and sex educators, social justice advocates, people living with HIV, primary health care providers, clergy, mental health counselors, nurses, and health plan executives.  Here are a few of the most impactful quotes taken from the discussion:

  • “We have to be open, and sex positive, to be in real conversations…or people will tune us out.”
  • “Wellness is about supporting people in having healthy positive sex lives.”
  • “Homophobia is rooted in misogyny.”
  • “As human beings, we need to know about our bodies, understand and connect with [those bodies] and forge pathways to feel good about ourselves…and that’s hard to do if you leave out S-E-X.”

One facilitator asked, “Is God (or Spirit) present in the room when you’re having sex?” Responses included:

  • “Why do people pray for a house and a good job but leave a desire for good sex out of our conversations with God (or Spirit)?”
  • “We need to pray for good sex … what’s the first thing out of your mouth when it’s good … Oh God!”
  • “If we aren’t really connecting, then sex isn’t as good.”
  • “Sex is a gift from God.”
  • “Sex can lead to glory or a not so good story.”
  • When referring to sex without a condom and utilizing PrEP: “If your Momma liked it raw, why would it be wrong for you to want the same thing?”
  • “We’ve all had bad sex – that’s part of life.  When something emotionally or spiritually is off for me, sex will be off for me too.  I don’t feel as free or liberated.  I need to honor the sacredness of me.”
  • “If God is in me, and in you, then whether you’re in me or I’m in you, God is always present.”
  • Others noted that a negative experience around God or religion affects some people’s view of God and sex:  “I was told God watched over me.  Well if God watched when I got molested, then I don’t want God to ever watch or be present again.”

When clients, patients or members are discussing their sexual health needs, issues, and concerns, one participant reminded medical and behavioral health professionals, “Don’t YUK my YUM!”  Participants agreed that facial expressions tell a client everything about what you think and feel.